Where is My Stimulus Check

Where is my stimulus check, you ask?  The IRS has started automatically directly depositing stimulus checks – referred to as “Economic Impact Payments”. Keep in mind, these payments need to be made to nearly 140 million eligible Americans.

Where IS My Stimulus Check

Some of you may have already received your payment. Lucky you! But, if not, don’t fret. Remember that this is going to be a process to get these payments out to all 140 million Americans. According to CNN, about 60 million Americans are still waiting for their money.

Some people, who don’t usually file a tax return, will need to submit basic information to the IRS before they will receive their payment. The IRS is regularly updating the Economic Impact Payment and the Get My Payment tool frequently asked questions pages on IRS.gov  as more information becomes available.

Answers to the Most Common Questions:

How are payments calculated and where will they be sent?
If taxpayers have already filed their 2019 tax return and requested direct deposit of their refund, the IRS will use this information to calculate and send their payment. Those who didn’t provide 2019 direct deposit information or owed tax, can use the Get My Payment tool to provide account information or a payment will be mailed. For those who haven’t filed their 2019 return, the IRS will use their 2018 tax return to calculate the payment.

Payments will also be automatic for those who receive Social Security, railroad retirement or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI and SSI) and veteran’s benefits who don’t normally file a tax return.

However, to add the $500 per eligible child amount to these payments, the IRS needs the dependent information before the payments are issued. Otherwise, their payment at this time will be $1,200 and, by law, the additional $500 per eligible child amount would be paid in association with a return filing for tax year 2020.

What if the IRS doesn’t have the taxpayer’s direct deposit information?
If the IRS has not processed the taxpayer’s payment, the taxpayer  may be able to use the Get My Payment tool to provide their banking information to the agency so their payments can be directly deposited. If no banking information is provided, IRS will mail a check to the taxpayer’s address on record. The direct debit account information used to make payments to the IRS cannot be used as the account information for the direct deposit of your payment.

Can taxpayers who aren’t required to file a tax return receive a payment?
Yes. People who don’t normally file can use Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info tool to give IRS basic information to get their Economic Impact Payments. This includes low-income or no income taxpayers.

Can taxpayers who haven’t filed a tax return for 2018 or 2019 still receive a payment?
Yes. Anyone who is required to file a tax return and has not filed a tax return for 2018 or 2019 should file their 2019 return do so as soon as possible to receive a payment. They should include direct deposit banking information on their return.

WATCH OUT FOR SCAMMERS!

The bad guys are out there phishing with renewed fervor. Phishing sites have increased 235% since the COVID-19 outbreak. Scammers have set up over 180,000 fake Coronavirus-themed websites to steal data or misinform taxpayers. Don’t take the bait.

According to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration, (TIGTA) the agency has already begun to see IRS Imposters playing every trick in the book to get personal information they can use to steal money. While the IRS Criminal Investigation Unit is doing all they can to combat this problem, people are still falling victim to these scams. Scammers are preying on vulnerable individuals who are not sure how best to get their stimulus payment.

TIPS TO NOT FALL VICTIM

  • Do not respond to anyone contacting you if they claim to be from the IRS. The IRS will never ever call you.
  • You may receive emails, text messages or contacted via social media by someone asking for verification of personal and/or banking info. They’ll claim the information is needed before you can receive your stimulus payment. Never give out your personal information.
  • NEVER click on links or open attachments in emails or text messages. Always go directly to the website using your internet browser.
  • You are not required to pay a fee to receive your payment, nor will paying an upfront fee result in you receiving your stimulus check faster.
  • Pay attention to web address extensions. The IRS website ends in “.gov” NOT “.com” or “.org” or “.net”.
  • Watch your spelling when entering a website address. Scammers register websites with misspelled names or similar names of legitimate websites  in hopes of tricking you.

If you receive an unsolicited email from someone claiming to be from the IRS, forward the email to phishing@irs.gov.  If you are looking for information about the COVID-19 pandemic you can go here.

To read a prior article I have recently written about IRS scams, go here

Pandemic Related Hazards Tsunami

Pandemic Related Hazards

I am urging all of you to be aware of an escalating number of pandemic related hazards. There is a full menu of scams, fraud and financial challenges lurking. Fraudsters are having a field day exploiting the uncertainties caused by the Coronavirus outbreak – COVID-19. They are using your fear and vulnerability as a weapon.

Here’s some examples of what these criminals are up to: From price gouging that’s preventing purchases of critical supplies, to fake products – promising cures; from loan payments to travel cancellations, from work-at-home schemes to Government Imposters seeking your personal information. AND – that’s just the tip of the iceberg!

Surviving Pandemic Related Hazards
In the meantime – Educate Yourself

How to Protect Yourself from the Coming Pandemic Related Hazards

  • Hang up on robocalls. Scammers are using illegal robocalls to pitch everything from fake coronavirus treatments to work-at-home schemes.
  • Ignore online offers for vaccinations and home test kits. At this time, there is no cure or vaccination for COVID-19, and there are no FDA-authorized home test kits. Visit the FDA’s website to learn more.
  • Do not respond to texts or emails about checks from the government from contacts you do not know. If someone tells you they can get you money immediately, it is a scam.
  • Do not click on web links from unfamiliar sources. These links could download viruses onto your computer or device.
  • Watch for emails claiming to be from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or experts saying they have information about the virus. For reliable and up-to-date information and updates, it is always best to visit the CDC’s website or the World Health Organization’s website.
  • Do your research before donating to charities claiming to help with COVID-19 efforts. Be wary of donations that require payment in cash, by gift card, or by wiring money.

If you think you are a victim of any of these pandemic related hazards involving COVID-19, you can report it without leaving your home through a number of platforms:

Some Additional Tips

Please know that government, the IRS and businesses have policies in place that are rapidly changing. Therefore, if you are seeking the latest policy of a particular entity, it is best to directly check their website rather than clicking on links in emails or attachments.

Government imposters have begun calling about COVID-19 relief. Imposters will call victims and suggest that you may qualify for a Government grant, but you have to verify your identity to process your request. Variations of the scheme involve contacts through text messages and social media posts.

Scams Coming About Stimulus Checks

IRS Pandemic Related Hazards
DON’T TAKE THE BAIT

The IRS is warning taxpayers of a tsunami of calls and phishing attempts about COVID-19 Stimulus checks. These contacts can lead to tax-related fraud and identity theft.

Scammers will suggest that you can get your Stimulus check faster if you share personal details like your Social Security number and banking information and also require you to pay a “processing fee”. DON’T TAKE THE BAIT!

Stimulus checks are free money provided from the Government. You do NOT need to spend money to receive your check. There are no short-cuts – even for a fee. The IRS will deposit your check into the direct deposit info you entered on your tax return or alternatively they will mail you a check.

The IRS will never call you or ask you to verify payment details.  Do not give out your bank account information, your debit or credit card number, or your PayPal payment details to someone who contacts you unsolicited.

The IRS has a webpage with information about the COVID-19 Stimulus payments that is updated quickly whenever new information is available. Here is the link

It’s impossible for me to cover all of the upcoming pandemic related hazards. However, the details listed above are a good refresher, especially for those who have been reading my prior articles. Remember that recognizing the red flags is one of the best weapons against scams and fraud.

You can read my prior article about Coronavirus Phishing Emails here.

I wish you and your loved ones all the best. BE SAFE OUT THERE.