BEWARE OF CHARITY SCAMMERS

Beware of Charity Scammers

While natural disasters, such as Hurricane Dorian, bring out the best in people who want to help, unfortunately it also brings out charity scammers.  People with good intentions are moved to want to help the victims of a disaster, while charity scammers are moved to take full advantage of the abundance of good will.

Charity scammers exploit disasters by posing as fake charities. Instead of collecting money to help disaster victims, they keep the money for themselves.

So – How Do They Do It?

In the aftermath of most disasters, charity scammers are hard at work sending out unsolicited emails, text messages, snail mail solicitations, social media advertisements and even come knocking at your door asking for donations.

Disaster Relief Charity Scammers
Choose Your Charity Wisely!

You can never be sure whether the person contacting you is legitimate or not!

Charity scammers are also very adept at creating phony, but legitimate-looking websites that appear to be real charities. They choose names of similar sounding charities to fool you into thinking they are legit. Charity scammers will provide you with a link to their fake websites. These fake websites capture unsuspecting victims who innocently enter their personal info including their SS#, address, phone # and credit card info.

Keyboard with Donate Button
Beware of Spoofed Charity Websites

FOLLOW THESE IMPORTANT TIPS:

  • Go directly to the charity yourself. You can find the address of a charity’s website and either mail them a check or go directly to the charity’s website (by typing in the website address yourself) and make your donation online.
  • Look for the padlock symbol and the website address to start with https, not just http. The “s” stands for a secure website. Also, realize that most charity websites will end in “.org”, not “.com”.  Be careful of making typos when entering web addresses too.
  • Never, ever click on links in an email, no matter how legitimate the email looks! The US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) is reminding everyone that malware purveyors frequently use natural disasters and breaking news stories to trick people into clicking on malicious links or opening up booby-trapped email attachments.
  • Be careful of what you see on your ‘Caller ID’. Most phone numbers are “spoofed” to look like the call is coming from a charity, when in fact, it’s a scammer calling.
  • Telemarketers who call you, representing a charity, receive a commission for each donation they receive. So only about half of your donation actually goes to help the charity. Besides, how can you be sure that the person calling you is from a legitimate charity?  You can’t!
  • To check out a charity, you should go to either charitynavigator.org or www.charitywatch.org  Both websites help you determine if a charity is legitimate. If the charity is not on the list, then beware! You can also learn how much of the money a charity collects, actually goes to the people they are supposed to be helping.
  • Always contribute by check or credit card to have a record of your donation. Never make a donation with cash, a pre-paid debit card, bank wire, or especially an iTunes or Amazon gift card.
  • The IRS allows taxpayers to use their Tax Exempt Organization Search Tool to help find or verify qualified charities. Donations to these qualified charities may be tax-deductible.
  • Contact any organization you’re considering, and ask for the charity’s address, phone number and financial records. Consider how much of your donation will go to the program you want to support, and how much will cover administrative costs. Legitimate groups will gladly provide information about their mission and how your donation will be used. If the charity you contact is unwilling to provide you with such information, be suspicious!

You can read a previous article I wrote about charity scams here.

 

 

DISASTER CHARITY SCAMS

DISASTER CHARITY SCAMS  Good Intentions – Bad Outcome

Beware of disaster charity scams! Fraudsters – posing as reputable Charitable Organizations – have been out in full force to trick you into making donations, to help victims of disasters.

Criminals always take advantage of kind-hearted, well-intentioned people who want to help after a disaster makes headline news. All of us need to be vigilant, because disaster charity scams will always appear to be totally legitimate.

Disaster Charity Scams
When Disaster Hits Watch Out For Fake Charities

Disaster Charity Scams normally start with unsolicited contacts in several ways. The scammer will contact their possible victim by telephone, social media, email solicitations, or at your door.

Then scammers use a variety of tried-and-proven tactics to lure information out of people. Donors should not give out personal financial information to anyone who solicits a contribution. This includes things like Social Security #, passwords or credit card and bank account numbers. You must always do your homework first.

Disaster Charity Scams Are Abundant
Always Do Your Research First!

THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW:

  • Thieves pretend they are from a familiar sounding charity. Their goal is to get money or personal financial information from unsuspecting donors.
  • Bogus websites use names that are the same name or a similar name of a legitimate charity. Emails that appear to come from a real charity will always provide a link that will take you to a fraudster’s bogus website.
  • Scammers may even try to get you to provide your social security number, claiming they need it for your receipt or for tax reporting. This is a falsehood! Never give a charity your SS#.
  • Always go directly to the source when making a charitable donation. Don’t trust strangers at your door, telemarketers on the phone or emails with links that will lead you to a fake charity website that appears legitimate.
  • Always contribute by check or credit card to have a record of your donation. Never make a donation with cash, a pre-paid debit card, bank wire, or an iTunes or Amazon gift card.
  • You can check out whether a charity is legitimate by going to www.charitynavigator.org or www.charitywatch.org  If the charity is not on the list, then beware!
  • Scammers may even claim to be working for ― or on behalf of ― the IRS. The thieves tell disaster victims they can help them file casualty loss claims to get big tax refunds.
  • The IRS website allows taxpayers to use their Tax Exempt Organization Search to help find or verify qualified charities. Donations to these qualified charities may be tax-deductible.
  • Contact any organization you’re considering, and ask for the charity’s address, phone number and financial records. Consider how much of your donation will go to the program you want to support, and how much will cover administrative costs. Legitimate groups will gladly provide information about their mission and how your donation will be used. If a charity is unwilling to provide you with such information, be suspicious!

HURRICANE HARVEY CHARITY SCAMS

Donors Beware of Hurricane Harvey Charity Scams!

While natural disasters such as Hurricane Harvey brings out the best in people, it also brings out the worst in Scammers, who are quick to take advantage.

As people see the visuals of the hurricane’s devastation, they are moved to want to help the survivors and families of the victims. Naturally they’ll seek out a charity they can donate to. But you must beware of fake charity scams!

 

Scammers take full advantage of people’s generosity by posing as fake charities. But instead of collecting money to help victims, they keep the money for themselves.

Charity Scams
Beware of Fake Charity Scams

These evil-doers are already sending emails, text messages, mail solicitations, and will soon appear at your door asking for money, under false pretenses.  They will also create fake charity scams via websites that use similar or familiar sounding charity names. These fake websites capture unsuspecting victims who innocently enter their credit card info to make a donation.

 

You can never be sure whether the person contacting you is legitimate or not!

 

FOLLOW THESE IMPORTANT TIPS:

1.) Go directly to the charity yourself. You can find the address of a charity’s website and either mail a check or go directly to the charity’s website (by typing in the website address yourself) and make your donation online.

2.) Look for the padlock symbol and the website address should begin with https, not just http.  The “s” stands for a secure website. Also, realize that most charity websites will end in “.org”, not “.com”!  Be careful of making typos when entering web addresses too.

3.) Never ever click on links in an email, no matter how legitimate the email looks! The US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) is reminding everyone that malware purveyors frequently use natural disasters and breaking news stories to trick people into clicking on malicious links or opening up booby-trapped email attachments. Fake charity scams always include links & attachments in unsolicited emails that look authentic.

4.) Be careful of what you see on your ‘Caller ID’. Most phone numbers are “spoofed” to look like the call is coming from a charity, when in fact, it’s a scammer calling.

5.)Telemarketers who call you, representing a charity, receive a commission for each donation they receive. So only about half of your donation actually goes to help the charity.  Besides, how can you be sure that the person calling you is from a legitimate charity?  You can’t!

6.)To check out a charity, you should go to www.charitynavigator.org.  Their website helps you determine if a charity is legitimate. You can also learn how much of the money a charity collects, actually goes to the people they are supposed to be helping.

Here are the names of a few charities that are providing assistance in the wake of Hurricane Harvey: Americares, International Relief Teams, Direct Relief, Global Giving, Save the Children and the American Red Cross. Charitynavigator.org also provides a list of local organizations, located in the most affected areas, who are providing support to people and animals.