SHOPPING SAFELY ONLINE

Shopping Safely Online is Important! 

Shopping safely online is more important now than ever before. Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, online sales have been skyrocketing. More and more of us are opting to get our basic necessities via online shopping.

There are dangers lurking anytime you are required to provide personally identifiable information (PII), such as passwords and payment information online.  You need to be cyber smart to reduce the risk of becoming a cyber crime victim.

Shopping Safely Online
Don’t Use Your Debit Card

Credit Cards vs. Debit Cards

When it comes to shopping safely online, one of the best tips I can give you is to use your CREDIT card instead of your debit card. If you have the choice, you should always use your credit card instead of your debit card when making online purchases.

Debit Cards Are Tied to Your Bank Account

We often forget that every time we make a purchase using a debit card, the funds are withdrawn directly from our checking account. When making purchases with a credit card, you’re using the bank’s money. It’s a line of credit, not real money from your checking account.

With a credit card, it’s the bank’s money that’s on the line. Therefore, you’re not going to be held liable for fraud. The bank will need to deal with it.  When it comes to credit card fraud, the most you could be liable for is $50 and the majority of banks waive the fee.

Debit cards however, do not offer the same fraud protections as a credit card. With a debit card you should be able to get your money back when and IF you report fraud promptly, but it could take 10 days or more to get it back. While the bank is investigating the fraud, your account is frozen, so you will have no access to the funds in that account. This could be a huge problem, if you need that money to pay your bills, and even more so, if you have bills that are set up for auto-pay.

There’s Different Rules for Debit Cards

If an unauthorized transaction appears on your bank statement (but your card or PIN has NOT been stolen) you won’t be liable for the debit if you report it within 60 days after your account statement is sent to you.  BUT – if the charge goes unreported for more than 60 days, your money could be lost. When you report the theft, the bank will investigate and decide if you they are required to credit the money back to your account.

Alternatively, the time frame is much shorter if your card or PIN was lost or stolen. You only have 2 business days in order to limit your liability to no more than $50 of unauthorized charges. After those 2 business days have passed, you’re liable for $500 of the amount lost, between 3 and 60 days. After 60 days, you are liable for the entire amount of your losses. You must, therefore, be sure to make a report as soon as you learn that your card is missing or that your PIN has been stolen.

How to Report a Suspicious Debit Charge

If you spot a fraudulent transaction, immediately call the card provider’s toll-free number on the back of the card. Ask them if you need to follow up with written correspondence. You can also read your monthly statement or error resolution notice for how and where to report any suspicious transactions. Lastly, if you get a replacement card, with a new number, remember to update any automatic payments that were linked to the original card.

More Tips for Shopping Safely Online

1.) Even when using a credit card, be careful where you shop online. Scammers have already set up millions of bogus online website shops. Especially since the Coronavirus pandemic began, fraudsters are trying to sell everything from COVID-19 DIY testing kits, to cleaning disinfectants and medical supplies.

2.) Only shop on websites that you know and trust and type the URL of the website yourself, instead of clicking on any links or attachments in emails. Be careful of your spelling too! Scammers often set up websites with incorrectly spelled names of common websites.

3.) When logging on to a website, utilize two-factor authentication (2FA) to ensure that the only person who has access to your account is you.

4.) Use long strong, stealth passwords or use a password manager. Always, use a separate stealth password for important sites you log on to. For example, be sure to use a separate password when logging into your online banking account than the one you will use to log on to your Facebook or Amazon account.

5.) Never use your debit card for recurring charges on the internet. Use a prepaid card with a limited amount of money available on it.

6.) Do not use public Wi-Fi at an airport, a hotel, a restaurant, etc. for online purchases. If you have no choice, then be sure to confirm the exact name of the network and login procedures to ensure that the network is legitimate.

7.) Use only websites that begin with “https://” when shopping online.  Watch out for website extensions.  Most online shopping website addresses end in “.com”

8.) Privacy is important too. Here’s a link to your privacy settings on Google.

You can read a prior article I wrote about shopping safely online here

 

Pandemic Related Hazards Tsunami

Pandemic Related Hazards

I am urging all of you to be aware of an escalating number of pandemic related hazards. There is a full menu of scams, fraud and financial challenges lurking. Fraudsters are having a field day exploiting the uncertainties caused by the Coronavirus outbreak – COVID-19. They are using your fear and vulnerability as a weapon.

Here’s some examples of what these criminals are up to: From price gouging that’s preventing purchases of critical supplies, to fake products – promising cures; from loan payments to travel cancellations, from work-at-home schemes to Government Imposters seeking your personal information. AND – that’s just the tip of the iceberg!

Surviving Pandemic Related Hazards
In the meantime – Educate Yourself

How to Protect Yourself from the Coming Pandemic Related Hazards

  • Hang up on robocalls. Scammers are using illegal robocalls to pitch everything from fake coronavirus treatments to work-at-home schemes.
  • Ignore online offers for vaccinations and home test kits. At this time, there is no cure or vaccination for COVID-19, and there are no FDA-authorized home test kits. Visit the FDA’s website to learn more.
  • Do not respond to texts or emails about checks from the government from contacts you do not know. If someone tells you they can get you money immediately, it is a scam.
  • Do not click on web links from unfamiliar sources. These links could download viruses onto your computer or device.
  • Watch for emails claiming to be from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or experts saying they have information about the virus. For reliable and up-to-date information and updates, it is always best to visit the CDC’s website or the World Health Organization’s website.
  • Do your research before donating to charities claiming to help with COVID-19 efforts. Be wary of donations that require payment in cash, by gift card, or by wiring money.

If you think you are a victim of any of these pandemic related hazards involving COVID-19, you can report it without leaving your home through a number of platforms:

Some Additional Tips

Please know that government, the IRS and businesses have policies in place that are rapidly changing. Therefore, if you are seeking the latest policy of a particular entity, it is best to directly check their website rather than clicking on links in emails or attachments.

Government imposters have begun calling about COVID-19 relief. Imposters will call victims and suggest that you may qualify for a Government grant, but you have to verify your identity to process your request. Variations of the scheme involve contacts through text messages and social media posts.

Scams Coming About Stimulus Checks

IRS Pandemic Related Hazards
DON’T TAKE THE BAIT

The IRS is warning taxpayers of a tsunami of calls and phishing attempts about COVID-19 Stimulus checks. These contacts can lead to tax-related fraud and identity theft.

Scammers will suggest that you can get your Stimulus check faster if you share personal details like your Social Security number and banking information and also require you to pay a “processing fee”. DON’T TAKE THE BAIT!

Stimulus checks are free money provided from the Government. You do NOT need to spend money to receive your check. There are no short-cuts – even for a fee. The IRS will deposit your check into the direct deposit info you entered on your tax return or alternatively they will mail you a check.

The IRS will never call you or ask you to verify payment details.  Do not give out your bank account information, your debit or credit card number, or your PayPal payment details to someone who contacts you unsolicited.

The IRS has a webpage with information about the COVID-19 Stimulus payments that is updated quickly whenever new information is available. Here is the link

It’s impossible for me to cover all of the upcoming pandemic related hazards. However, the details listed above are a good refresher, especially for those who have been reading my prior articles. Remember that recognizing the red flags is one of the best weapons against scams and fraud.

You can read my prior article about Coronavirus Phishing Emails here.

I wish you and your loved ones all the best. BE SAFE OUT THERE.