BEWARE OF CHARITY SCAMMERS

Beware of Charity Scammers

While natural disasters, such as Hurricane Dorian, bring out the best in people who want to help, unfortunately it also brings out charity scammers.  People with good intentions are moved to want to help the victims of a disaster, while charity scammers are moved to take full advantage of the abundance of good will.

Charity scammers exploit disasters by posing as fake charities. Instead of collecting money to help disaster victims, they keep the money for themselves.

So – How Do They Do It?

In the aftermath of most disasters, charity scammers are hard at work sending out unsolicited emails, text messages, snail mail solicitations, social media advertisements and even come knocking at your door asking for donations.

Disaster Relief Charity Scammers
Choose Your Charity Wisely!

You can never be sure whether the person contacting you is legitimate or not!

Charity scammers are also very adept at creating phony, but legitimate-looking websites that appear to be real charities. They choose names of similar sounding charities to fool you into thinking they are legit. Charity scammers will provide you with a link to their fake websites. These fake websites capture unsuspecting victims who innocently enter their personal info including their SS#, address, phone # and credit card info.

Keyboard with Donate Button
Beware of Spoofed Charity Websites

FOLLOW THESE IMPORTANT TIPS:

  • Go directly to the charity yourself. You can find the address of a charity’s website and either mail them a check or go directly to the charity’s website (by typing in the website address yourself) and make your donation online.
  • Look for the padlock symbol and the website address to start with https, not just http. The “s” stands for a secure website. Also, realize that most charity websites will end in “.org”, not “.com”.  Be careful of making typos when entering web addresses too.
  • Never, ever click on links in an email, no matter how legitimate the email looks! The US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) is reminding everyone that malware purveyors frequently use natural disasters and breaking news stories to trick people into clicking on malicious links or opening up booby-trapped email attachments.
  • Be careful of what you see on your ‘Caller ID’. Most phone numbers are “spoofed” to look like the call is coming from a charity, when in fact, it’s a scammer calling.
  • Telemarketers who call you, representing a charity, receive a commission for each donation they receive. So only about half of your donation actually goes to help the charity. Besides, how can you be sure that the person calling you is from a legitimate charity?  You can’t!
  • To check out a charity, you should go to either charitynavigator.org or www.charitywatch.org  Both websites help you determine if a charity is legitimate. If the charity is not on the list, then beware! You can also learn how much of the money a charity collects, actually goes to the people they are supposed to be helping.
  • Always contribute by check or credit card to have a record of your donation. Never make a donation with cash, a pre-paid debit card, bank wire, or especially an iTunes or Amazon gift card.
  • The IRS allows taxpayers to use their Tax Exempt Organization Search Tool to help find or verify qualified charities. Donations to these qualified charities may be tax-deductible.
  • Contact any organization you’re considering, and ask for the charity’s address, phone number and financial records. Consider how much of your donation will go to the program you want to support, and how much will cover administrative costs. Legitimate groups will gladly provide information about their mission and how your donation will be used. If the charity you contact is unwilling to provide you with such information, be suspicious!

You can read a previous article I wrote about charity scams here.

 

 

Tis the Season…For Holiday Scams

The holiday shopping season is underway and Scammers are already gearing up to exploit innocent victims with holiday scams. They love this time of year, when they have even more opportunities to separate you from your money.

Holiday Scams Warning

Here’s a list of Holiday Scams to help  keep you safer & smarter!

Spam Phishing Emails will be finding their way into your inbox. These emails have urgent messages or will contain offers for bargain prices or discount coupons. They will always include a clickable link or an attachment to open. If you click on the provided link or attachment, you will infect your device with Malware. It is advisable to never click on email links or attachments.

Package Delivery Scams are a Fraudster’s favorite trick. They know that most of you are either sending or expecting to receive a package during the holidays. Many millions of spam emails, pretending to be from known shippers (like the Post Office, FedEx or UPS) will be sent out to unsuspecting victims. The emails will include a link to click on that lets you “track” a problem with a package you recently mailed or “track” a package that’s on its way to your house.

E-cards are a fun, easy & inexpensive way to send holiday cheer to family and friends. Make sure any e-card you receive comes from a well-known reputable e-card company. Do NOT open it if the sender is unknown to you.  Many fake e-cards contain spyware and viruses.

Gift cards make popular holiday gifts. Be sure to only purchase them from official retail stores or websites that you know and trust. Beware of websites or ads offering steep discounts for gift cards. Chances are the cards are fraudulent or stolen cards from third-party vendors.

Fake websites will pop up all over the internet offering fantastic bargains. Beware of copy-cat websites or sites that use similar or misspelled names of legitimate retailers. You may not realize that you’re on a fake website and enter your password or credit card information. You think you actually made a purchase, but your merchandise will never arrive and your credit card information will now be used to make illegal purchases.

A good place to evaluate websites selling retail goods is http://www.resellerRatings.com  where you can find reviews about merchants and see if they’re legitimate. If they’re not listed there, chances are it’s a holiday scams website.

Fake online Ads will appear on social media sites and even on legitimate News websites. They exist to entice you to click on links that will either contain keystroke-logging Malware or lure you into providing personal information that will make you a victim of Identity Theft.

Public WiFi is neither private nor secure. You can never be sure whether you’re using the authorized WiFi of the retailer or actually the WiFi of the thief, sitting a few tables away. Use a Virtual Private Network (VPN) when using WiFi, for better online security. Make sure to NEVER use your debit card while shopping online. Your debit card is tied to the money in your checking account. You have better consumer protection when using your credit card. Better yet, use a gift card or prepaid debit card for all your online purchases.

HURRICANE HARVEY CHARITY SCAMS

Donors Beware of Hurricane Harvey Charity Scams!

While natural disasters such as Hurricane Harvey brings out the best in people, it also brings out the worst in Scammers, who are quick to take advantage.

As people see the visuals of the hurricane’s devastation, they are moved to want to help the survivors and families of the victims. Naturally they’ll seek out a charity they can donate to. But you must beware of fake charity scams!

 

Scammers take full advantage of people’s generosity by posing as fake charities. But instead of collecting money to help victims, they keep the money for themselves.

Charity Scams
Beware of Fake Charity Scams

These evil-doers are already sending emails, text messages, mail solicitations, and will soon appear at your door asking for money, under false pretenses.  They will also create fake charity scams via websites that use similar or familiar sounding charity names. These fake websites capture unsuspecting victims who innocently enter their credit card info to make a donation.

 

You can never be sure whether the person contacting you is legitimate or not!

 

FOLLOW THESE IMPORTANT TIPS:

1.) Go directly to the charity yourself. You can find the address of a charity’s website and either mail a check or go directly to the charity’s website (by typing in the website address yourself) and make your donation online.

2.) Look for the padlock symbol and the website address should begin with https, not just http.  The “s” stands for a secure website. Also, realize that most charity websites will end in “.org”, not “.com”!  Be careful of making typos when entering web addresses too.

3.) Never ever click on links in an email, no matter how legitimate the email looks! The US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) is reminding everyone that malware purveyors frequently use natural disasters and breaking news stories to trick people into clicking on malicious links or opening up booby-trapped email attachments. Fake charity scams always include links & attachments in unsolicited emails that look authentic.

4.) Be careful of what you see on your ‘Caller ID’. Most phone numbers are “spoofed” to look like the call is coming from a charity, when in fact, it’s a scammer calling.

5.)Telemarketers who call you, representing a charity, receive a commission for each donation they receive. So only about half of your donation actually goes to help the charity.  Besides, how can you be sure that the person calling you is from a legitimate charity?  You can’t!

6.)To check out a charity, you should go to www.charitynavigator.org.  Their website helps you determine if a charity is legitimate. You can also learn how much of the money a charity collects, actually goes to the people they are supposed to be helping.

Here are the names of a few charities that are providing assistance in the wake of Hurricane Harvey: Americares, International Relief Teams, Direct Relief, Global Giving, Save the Children and the American Red Cross. Charitynavigator.org also provides a list of local organizations, located in the most affected areas, who are providing support to people and animals.