Coronavirus Phishing Emails on the Rise

Coronavirus
WASH YOUR HANDS

A global health disaster like coronavirus is a golden opportunity for criminals looking to steal your personal information or money through Coronavirus Phishing Emails.

Portions of this article were reprinted from the website of consumer advocate, Herb Weisbaum, also known as Consumerman. His website is here: https://consumerman.com/

If you got an email from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the World Health Organization about the Coronavirus outbreak, would you read it? Maybe click on a link? Cybercriminals are counting on it!

The outbreak is a dream come true for criminals who will use it as basis for email attacks designed to snag personal information, steal money and infect computers with malware.

Coronavirus phishing emails are on the rise. Malicious emails linked to the Coronavirus first appeared in early February, making it one of the first big phishing campaigns of the year.

“A global health disaster like this one, creates a golden opportunity for fraudsters, as there is no population or demographic that is not paying attention. As a result, the potential for impulse clicking is higher than normal,” said Adam Levin, a digital security expert who is chairman of CyberScout, a data security firm, and the author of “Swiped: How to Protect Yourself in a World Full of Scammers, Phishers and Identity Thieves.”

The bogus emails look legit

Coronavirus Phishing Emails may look legit, but they’re not! Those who click on the provided link in the email will wind up on a site created by criminals to steal the victims’ email credentials.

With the current Coronavirus phishing emails, fraudsters are designing their emails to look like they’re coming from the CDC or the WHO. They typically have an attention-grabbing subject line, such as “Coronavirus outbreak in your city (Emergency)” and often include the agency’s logo — cut and pasted from the real website — to add credibility.

At first glance, the sender’s email address appears to be legitimate, for example cdc-gov.org or cdcgov.org. The crooks create domains that are very close to the real CDC site — cdc.gov — making the deception easy to miss.

Even though the link looks like it will take you to the CDC.gov website about the Coronavirus, it will not.

You will instead, land on a fake Microsoft Outlook login page, created by the crooks to steal user names and passwords. Criminals control this fake Outlook page. There is no reason to provide login credentials to visit a public website, such as the CDC.

“Once they capture your login credentials, they can use them to get access to your email account and look for anything worth stealing.

BUT IT GETS WORSE

The bad guys have taken things to the next level, using the Coronavirus to infect computers with Malware!

Emails impersonating the CDC include attachments to click on that proclaim the need for the reader to open it to get advice on how to protect yourself. If you open this attachment, it will download Malware or Ransomware onto your computer.

Ransomware locks out all of your computer files and demands a ransom payment to unlock your files. I have written more extensively about Ransomware in a prior article that you can read here.

Just remember that health agencies are NOT sending out mass emails about Coronavirus. There are plenty of legitimate news websites and the CDC website, CDC.gov  itself with important updates and everything you need to know about the Coronavirus outbreak.

How to protect yourself from coronavirus scams

You need to be skeptical of any email that asks you to click on a link or open an attachment — even when the email seems legitimate.

In most cases, you can probably get the information you need by typing in the URL yourself. For the latest on the Coronavirus outbreak go directly to the CDC website.

TIPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF:

  • Don’t be taken in by the sender’s name.Scammers can put any name they like in the “from” field.
  • Look out for spelling and grammatical errors.Not all crooks make mistakes, but many do. Take extra time to review messages for telltale signs that they’re fraudulent.
  • Check the URL before you type it in or click a link.If the website you land on doesn’t look right, steer clear. Do your own research and make your own choice about where to look.
  • Never enter data that a website shouldn’t be asking for. A site that’s open to the public, such as the CDC or WHO, will never ask for your login credentials.
  • If you realize you just revealed your password to impostors, change it as soon as possible.The crooks try to use stolen passwords immediately, so the sooner you change your password, the more likely you are to stop them for doing anything malicious.
  • Never use the same password on more than one site.Once crooks have a password, they’ll try it on every website where you might have an account, to see if they can get lucky.
  • Turn on two-factor authentication (2FA), if you can. Yes, it’s a slight inconvenience to enter a six-digit code when you want to log on, but it’s a huge barrier for the crooks. With 2FA, a stolen password, by itself, is useless to them.

Prevention, Symptoms and Treatment of COVID-19

There’s currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. The CDC recommends preventive actions every day to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Stay home when you’re sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue away.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Follow CDC’s recommendations for using a face mask. (see below)
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing or being out in public.
  • If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

MORE TIPS FROM THE CDC:

The CDC doesn’t recommend that people who are well wear a face mask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19.

Face masks should ONLY be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others. The use of facemasks is also crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone in close settings.

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for COVID-19 cases, the CDC said. Symptoms may appear two to 14 days after exposure to the virus and include fever, cough and shortness of breath.

There’s no specific treatment recommended for COVID-19. People with COVID-19 should get care to help relieve symptoms. For severe cases, treatment should include care to support vital organ functions, the CDC said.

People who think they may have been exposed to COVID-19 should contact their healthcare provider immediately.

RANSOMWARE-Always Update & Backup Your Devices

In May, two world-wide Ransomware attacks infected 200,000 computers in over 150 countries. This was a problem that should never have even happened at all. So, how did it happen? Ransomeware Screenshot

The infected computers were not ‘updated’ quickly enough. Both strains of Ransomware, known as “Petya” and “WannaCry”, were developed to take advantage of a Microsoft Windows Operating System flaw. A timely update would have easily patched this vulnerability.

In fact, Microsoft had already issued a patch to eliminate this flaw. But only those who timely updated their devices, as soon as the security patch became available, were safe. The lesson learned here is to always, always keep your devices updated. All your devices should be set to automatically do these updates, as soon as they become available.

Additionally, many of the infected computers were using outdated operating systems. Microsoft no longer issues security patches or updates for Windows XP, Vista and Windows Server 2003. If you are still using an outdated operating system, it is imperative that you upgrade to a newer one, so your computer is protected from dangerous exploits.

Go here for Microsoft’s free security updates for older operating systems: https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/msrc/2017/05/12/customer-guidance-for-wannacrypt-attacks/

TIPS TO AVOID FALLING VICTIM:

First: Ransomware is easily spread via phishing emails. Phishing emails include an urgent link or an attachment. Unsuspecting victims are lured into clicking on or opening them. Never click on links or open an attachment in an email or text message, unless you are 110% sure it’s safe to do so! You must always first verify that the email or text message is legitimate.

Second: To help prevent losing your files from Ransomware, you must regularly back up your files, either in the cloud or copy important files to a separate external hard drive or flash drive that is not connected to your device.

Third: You should never pay the ransom! There is no guarantee that you will ever get your files back by simply paying the ransom! In fact, paying the ransom simply puts you on a “Sucker List”.

Here is a great resource website: https://www.nomoreransom/org/  The website provides free decryption tools that have proven to be effective against many, but not all, strains of Ransomware.